Featured Rings:

UT Dallas Art Barn

We are initiating a Yarn Bombing! “Arms Around The Barn”. Bring a sweater decorated with your name, Graduation Year or projected year, your major & class you have taken in the Art Barn if Art & Performance or Aesthetics or ATEC is not your major. We will knit them together wrist to wrist and wrap the UTD Art Barn. This will be a fabulous visual map to everyone about how loved this building is. If we continue to raze every old building to the ground on this campus, we lose our heritage. This little gem of 70′s modernist architecture should be retained with all it’s charm. It’s an Art icon to our campus and the surrounding DFW area.

—Cynthia, Jennifer B., Lance, Greg, Kaitlyn, Corinne, Lori, Eric, & Jennifer V.

Support the UT Dallas Art Barn on Facebook.

Girls Mentorship

I put a ring on the girls I mentor at church. They are part of a group that works to advocate for women’s leadership and visibility in the church. I love that there’s such a wide age range between them– the oldest one here just finished college, and the youngest one is in first grade. They work together and support each other, and leading this group has been so meaningful and fulfilling for me. They were the obvious choice for a ring because I love them more than anyone in the world and they’ve given my life a lot of purpose. I crocheted my ring with acrylic yarn. The diamond was made in panels that were reinforced with posterboard and then sewn together.

—Mariam

Eliot

Following a major house fire a few years ago, a lovely sassafras tree just outside our back door met its end during the rebuilding that followed.  A chance meeting with a chain saw artist led to the discovery that the dead stump left behind contained a tree spirit within.  This is Eliot — short for T. S. Eliot — who now presides over our garden and serves as a constant reminder of the good that can come from evil.   Here he sports a knitted gold cabled ring with a pink heart-shaped diamond.  Thank you, Eliot, for reminding me to keep a positive outlook.
—Judy

The Rumor Mill Cafe

This ring is crocheted of acrylic rug yarn and sewn onto a frame of coat-hanger wire. Plastic opalescent beads are attached with telephone wire. It’s hung with a clear push pin onto the wall next to a busy bulletin board space. I like the way the push pin picks up opalescence from the ring’s ‘jewels.’
In late May of 2013, I mounted a crocheted monster foot at the base of a parking meter in front of The Rumor Mill, and it has remained there undisturbed ever since. I ‘visit’ the monster foot a couple of times a week when I go to The Rumor Mill for lunch or brunch.
 
There’s always a well-chosen display of art on the inside walls of The Rumor Mill, and they also provide an occasional venue for readings and live music. When my poetry collection comes out, I intend to host a publication party at The Rumor Mill.

—Frances

Watts Towers

I chose Watts Towers because of its iconic stature to LA and yet so many Angelenos have not gone to see it. Last year,  I began working on a sound project linking the towers with Antoni Gaudi’s work in Barcelona so it’s been heavy on my mind lately.
Ring: Recycled Metro vinyl on vintage fabric, shoelace
Sewing machine: Last year, I started taking sewing lessons at Sew LA in Atwater partly in honor of my late Grandmother who was a seamstress.

The Arizona Sunset

Our house faced west, and we would actually sit outside and watch the changing colors of the sunset until it got dark. Many of those sunsets and dramatic skies are captured in Arizona Highways Magazine from the late 60′s & early 70′s.

Like most places, development has completely changed that landscape. I miss it, I think about it a lot sometimes. You used to be able to see the Milky Way at night, and you can’t anymore. But, do I miss that time in my life? Oh hell no! I wouldn’t want to go back in time for anything. I’m much happier now, and I love where I live. I guess what I’m really putting my ring on is the treasured memories of that spectacular landscape.

My ring is crocheted using double and triple crochet stitches. The “jewel” is a small piece of hyperbolic crochet.

—Julie, Los Angeles